Why does chocolate get white dots when it sets?

by Shabz
(Birmingham)

I'm trying to make chocolate coated balls.


I melt the chocolate in a pre-heated glass bowl. When I coat the balls they look fine but when they dry (set) they get white dots on them.

How can I prevent the dots from appearing?






Hi Shabz,

Usually the reason chocolate gets white dots is because of a change in temperature that causes the fat and/or sugars to separate and rise to the surface. This is called "bloom."


When you make your chocolate coated balls, are you placing them in the refrigerator or freezer to set? That may be the problem.


Try allowing them to set at room temperature and see if you still get the same results.


Another problem may be that the centers (balls) are cold when you dip them in the chocolate. Is that the case? If so, try letting the centers reach room temperature before covering them in chocolate.


I hope one of those suggestions provides you with the solution and gets rid of the white dots for you.


Kind regards,
Angie

Comments for Why does chocolate get white dots when it sets?

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Jan 01, 2018
Temper, temper, temper!! NEW
by: Lauren

While all of the previously mentioned factors (chocolate bloom, treats are too cold etc.) could POTENTIALLY be the reason, it's MORE likely that your chocolate is developing 'white dots' due to the chocolate not being in TEMPER.
Believe it or not, there's actually a LOT of science that goes into working with REAL chocolate (chocolate chips, solid chocolate candy bars etc.) In attempt to not talk your ear off, chocolate needs to be melted to a certain temperature and then cooled rapidly, so that it will set properly. Though, every BRAND of chocolate is different, they usually fall between a certain set of numbers. There are a LOT of resources online that give you those numbers, but for examples sake- dark chocolate needs to be melted to between 114-118° F (to ensure all crystals have been melted) and then cooled to between 88-90°F by a process called seeding (which is just adding already tempered chocolate to the melted chocolate and stirring). The stirring helps cool the chocolate but also knocks these crystals into each other to make a wealth of 'form v' crystals. Lots of Form V crystals is what will allow you to have spot and streak free chocolate as well as that satisfying SNAP when you bite into it.
I hope that helped you a little bit with your chocolate endeavors!
Be well and keep chocolating!
- Lauren

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